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Henry R. and Mary Hewitt Mather House

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1867, Carl F. Struck of the Henry Lord Gay Company; 1878 addition. 450 E. Ridge St.

This Gothic Revival house with decorated bargeboard, lancet windows extending into gables, hooded windows, and board-and-batten siding exemplifies America's premier wood building tradition. Clearly reflecting the writings of Andrew Jackson Downing, it is among the oldest in the neighborhood. The house was designed by Struck of the Henry Lord Gay Company. Gay had studied with Sidney Stone in New Haven and worked with W. W. Boyington in Chicago. At the same time as this house was designed, Gay was planning Marquette's first major commercial block for Mather and Peter White: the First National Bank and the Superior Building (both destroyed). Mather (1824–1888) came from Cleveland to Marquette to invest in mineral lands and became the first president of the Cleveland Iron Mining Company.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Henry R. and Mary Hewitt Mather House", [Marquette, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-MQ15.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 511-511.

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