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Theophilus and Roxanna Osgood House

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1846. 744 Samaria Rd., 2.9 miles northwest of Erie

Built on 160 acres of land acquired in 1835 from the U.S. government by settlers from western New York State, this provincial Greek Revival house exemplifies the cobblestone masonry wall-building tradition popular there from 1825 to 1865, a tradition that was transplanted across western Ontario, southern Michigan, and Wisconsin, with the opening of the Erie Canal. In this case, Theophilus and Roxanna Osgood gathered cobblestones, three to four inches in size, from nearby Stony Ridge and had a local mechanic lay them in regular horizontal courses in the walls of their one-and-a-half-story, side-gable-and-wing house. A deep plain entablature, stone window lintels and sills, and corner pilaster boards are Greek Revival elements that hint at their New York State origins. The porch and the dormers are later additions.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Theophilus and Roxanna Osgood House", [Erie, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-MR20.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 137-137.

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