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St. Mary’s Catholic Church

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c. 1929, George P. Stauduhar. 1606 116th St., 6 miles east of Dazey

St. Mary’s Catholic Church is known locally for the German American Eucharistic Corpus Christi commemoration held annually since 1905 that entails visiting the Stations of the Cross by walking the perimeter of the cloistered landscape. The commemoration is augmented by a brass band and male choir. Based on an architectural design by Stauduhar of Rock Island, Illinois, who was a favorite architect of Bishop John Shanley, St. Mary’s church was constructed under Bishop James O’Reilly, shortly after Stauduhar’s 1929 death while inspecting construction of Mercy Hospital nearby in Valley City. Battered side walls and buttresses make this framed, stuccoed building an interesting mix of Gothic Revival with Spanish-influenced gables, and the smooth surfaces are vaguely Moderne.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
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Data

Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "St. Mary’s Catholic Church", [Dazey, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-BA10.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 63-63.

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