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Commercial Building (Union State Bank)

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Union State Bank
c. 1910. Main St. at 1st. Ave. W

This bank has had a checkered past. Although the historical record is scant, the bank appears to have been an undercapitalized speculative enterprise by two Fargo bankers, an enterprise that failed soon after it opened and well before the economic collapse of the late 1920s. It reopened as the First National Investment Company building and leased space to the post office. From 1932, the building was a popular bar and pool hall. The two-story Romanesque Revival building is constructed of dark-colored hard-fired brick with sandstone trim, and there is a freestanding sandstone column at the corner entrance. Windows have been replaced rather unsympathetically, but the stained glass transom windows remain visible above the first-floor openings.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
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Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Commercial Building (Union State Bank)", [Ashley, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-MT6.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 206-206.

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