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Zephyr Cove Resort

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The resort encompasses about sixty acres of land between U.S. 50 and the lakeshore. Once part of George Whittell's estate, it is now owned by the U.S. Forest Service. Development began adjacent to the Lincoln Highway, which ran closer to the lake than does the current U.S. 50. The majority of buildings are small one-story cabins sited on paths leading toward the shore. The largest structure at the resort is the main lodge, which stands on the west side of U.S. 50.

The Bliss family's Carson and Tahoe Lumber and Fluming Company owned the land and in the late 1920s began to develop a resort. Individual one-room cabins had cedar bark siding and tar-paper roofs. Later structures had halfround pine siding to create a log cabin effect. Many of the original buildings have been demolished or moved, and new buildings have been erected, but the resort retains its rustic character with utilitarian but quaint cabins nestled among fir trees. Built to cater to middleclass vacationers, the resort continues to do so today.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
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Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Zephyr Cove Resort", [, Nevada], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/NV-01-NW007.

Print Source

Buildings of Nevada, Julie Nicoletta. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, 61-61.

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