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Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Cathedral

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1967–1971, John V. Tomich. 450 Maxwell Dr., Whitehall
  • Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Cathedral (Lu Donnelly)

Churches once best expressed ethnic identity in Pittsburgh, as they did everywhere else in America, but have played a minor role in local architecture since World War II. This is one of the few postwar religious sites in Allegheny County that demands a visit, having liberated itself from denominational stereotypes while still deriving strength from architectural history. Holy Trinity uses uncompromising poured-concrete walls inside and out to evoke the ancient triconch plan of Byzantine architecture. What saves the church from being a mere pastiche of historic precedents and architectural clichés is what saved Richardson from falling into the same trap at his courthouse: a highly personalized vision coupled with the artistic authority to carry it out.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Data

Timeline

  • 1967

    Built

What's Nearby

Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Cathedral", [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-AL128.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 127-127.

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