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USX Tower (United States Steel Building)

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United States Steel Building
1967–1971, Harrison and Abramovitz, and Abbe Architects. 600 Grant St.
  • USX Tower (United States Steel Building)
  • USX Tower (United States Steel Building)

At 64 stories and 841 feet, the tallest structure in downtown Pittsburgh, the USX Tower is symbolic of the city both in its triangular shape and its structural innovations in steel. The exterior features eighteen exposed vertical steel columns, each set three feet outside the curtain wall, such that columns and curtain wall connect at every third floor. The columns of Cor-Ten steel are self-oxidizing, hence unable to rust further. Every column circulates coolant inside, so should the tower ever be engulfed in flames, it would keep cool for four hours before surrendering to the heat.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "USX Tower (United States Steel Building)", [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-AL17.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 53-53.

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