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Headquarters of Pennswoods.net (John J. Barclay House)

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John J. Barclay House
1858. 230 S. Juliana St.

This large red brick house built for lawyer John Jacob Barclay has Italianate ornament and detailing with the massing and scale of the later Colonial Revival. The jerkinhead roof and dormer are accented by corbeled end chimneys. Paired brackets line the cornices and act as capitals for the columns supporting the porch roof. Paired, elongated double-sash windows have squared dripstones as lintels, with variations in the central bay. The plan has a central hall with four rooms per floor. Marble mantels and a walnut railing highlight the interior. A rear wing contains the kitchen, pantry, and servants' rooms. Across the street, the Job Mann house (1842; 231 S. Juliana Street) is a handsome five-bay, red brick Greek Revival house with an inset doorway.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Headquarters of Pennswoods.net (John J. Barclay House)", [Bedford, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-BD7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 376-376.

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