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Newmyer House and Barn

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c. 1794 barn; 1820 house. 316 Richey Rd. (PA 1027), 5.5 miles north of Connellsville

This is one of the region's earliest stone barns called a Pennsylvania barn, not for its location but for its architectural attributes: a forebay and a banked entrance. Also called a Sweitzer (Pennsylvania German variant of Schweitzer) or Swiss barn, this type was commonly built into a hillside by German farmers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and given a saltbox roof. This barn has an earthen ramp, projecting frame forebay, and simple slit ventilators in its stone side walls. An interesting hybrid, the roof framing is English, while the barn shape is Germanic. As was typical, the barn was more substantial than the original farmhouse, which was a log house rather than the five-bay brick house on a raised basement found on the premises today.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Newmyer House and Barn", [Connellsville, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-FA26.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 253-254.

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