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Reppert-Gabler House

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c. 1810; c. 1880 addition. 300 block PA 2014

This house was built in two parts by two generations of glassworkers. The original c. 1810 portion was built by George Reppert as a three-bay, two-story red brick house with a side stair and two rooms on each floor. At the time, he was helping to relocate the New Geneva glassworks to Greene County from Fayette County. John C. Gabler, son of one of Reppert's glassmaking partners, constructed the c. 1880 addition. The Gabler family bought the house in 1832, and owned it for 150 years. A fine Federal doorway and back-to-back triangular fireplaces distinguish the earliest, southern portion of the house. The northern portion consists of two-and-one-half stories with three rooms on each floor under a gabled roof. The house's two sections intersect to create a T-shaped plan. Across the road at 363 PA 2014, cooper John Minor Crawford built an Italianate brick house c. 1878 with the money earned shipping pottery in his barrels.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Reppert-Gabler House", [Greensboro, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-GR13.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 271-271.

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