You are here

Living Waters Camp

-A A +A
1935 established; 1939 tabernacle. PA 240 at Redwood Rd., 0.3 miles west of PA 580, 2 miles southwest of Cherry Tree

The Living Waters Camp opened in 1935 as a tent camp and spiritual retreat for the Assembly of God congregations. Today it is an independent Christian camp. During the 1920s and 1930s, David McDowell, an engineer in the ministry, developed the prototype for the Assemblies of God rural retreat tabernacles, one of which forms the nucleus of the Living Waters Camp. Constructed in 1939 of wooden trusswork and covered with tongue and groove vertical siding, it has wide folding doors on the side elevations so that the congregation can open the walls to increase air circulation. Clere-story windows provide natural light and ventilation. In 1959, asphalt replaced the straw that had been strewn over the dirt floor. The original straight-backed wooden benches are still in use. There are over two dozen single-family cottages on the property, built and rebuilt over the years. Most of them are simple one-room clapboard cabins with a few two- and four-room buildings as well. Assorted modern buildings such as a dormitory and cafeteria lie to the southeast.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Living Waters Camp", [Schellsburg, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-IN9.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 207-207.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,