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Cascade Center (Knox Building, Cascade Theater)

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Knox Building, Cascade Theater
1875. 11–17 S. Mill St.

This building was Warner Brothers' first theater. The four Warner brothers, Harry, Sam, Albert, and Jack, who owned a bicycle shop in Youngstown, were introduced to the nickelodeon in Pittsburgh at the turn of the twentieth century. They operated the Cascade Theater (Knox Building) here between 1907 and 1917. A two-story rear ell housed the 99-seat theater on the second floor. Sam Warner went to Los Angeles in 1912, and opened an office that grew into the Warner Brothers Studio of national prominence. In 2005, the building became part of a joint public/private partnership at the Riverplex, a theme mall with a refurbished theater, restaurants, and retail shops. Rehabilitation began with a modest gift from the Time-Warner Company.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Cascade Center (Knox Building, Cascade Theater)", [New Castle, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-LA2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 549-549.

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