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Blank Funeral Home (Boyd-Elliott House)

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Boyd-Elliott House
1770s, 1876. 309 Water St.

This imposing forty-four-room Second Empire mansion was the home of William Elliott, a regional railroad contractor. Railroading was the road to wealth in the nineteenth century, and even in the hinterlands the results could be opulent. Yet rural frugality survived as well: instead of demolishing the two existing buildings on the site, Elliott's builder combined them into an impressive architectural solution. The earlier eighteenth-century building at the back was amalgamated with the central-hall brick colonial house on King Street into a larger house with a four-story tower. The slate-covered mansard roofs and bracketed cornices act to draw the wings together in a convincing, if unruly, whole.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Blank Funeral Home (Boyd-Elliott House)", [Northumberland, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-NB13.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 400-400.

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