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Clyde Brothers House and Workshop

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c. 1800, 1830, 1840, 1860. 91 and 95 King St.

In the early nineteenth century, these elegant two-story Federal-style houses were the residence and workshop of chair makers Thomas and William Clyde. Built of brick laid in Flemish bond with double chimneys and six-over-six shuttered windows, the houses were constructed in two stages. The three-bay section built around 1800 on the southwest corner of Front and King streets has a large Palladian attic window on the gable end facing the street and two arched service doors surmounted by fanlights. In the 1840s, a twin was attached with an extra bay added to provide a passageway between the buildings for deliveries. Both houses were updated with Italianate bracketed door surrounds in the 1860s.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Clyde Brothers House and Workshop", [Northumberland, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-NB14.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 400-400.

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