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Arch Street Methodist Church

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1864; 1869–1870, Addison Hutton. 55 N. Broad St.
  • Arch Street Methodist Church
  • Arch Street Methodist Church

Like James H. Windrim next door (PH50), Hutton was also a pupil of Samuel Sloan, and this design for a middle-class Methodist congregation reveals the limits of Sloan's pupils, who were more caught up with forms than ideas. Here Pennsylvania marble is worked into late English Gothic forms dependent on the publications of A. W. N. Pugin, with no concession toward the polychromed Victorian Gothic that had swept England a generation earlier. Of special note is the contrast between the picturesquely random rubble of the 1864 chapel at the south end (by an unknown architect, perhaps John Notman) and the rather mechanical large ashlar of Hutton's church. The main hall with its Gothic-traceried ceiling and splendid English tower was completed in 1869–1870.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Arch Street Methodist Church", [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-PH51.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 85-85.

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