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Jesse Robinson House

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1888, Pierce and Dockstader. 141 Main St.

Jesse Robinson, who became president of the First National Bank of Wellsboro on his father's (John Robinson, TI6) death in 1893, commissioned architects from nearby Elmira, New York, to design this superlative Queen Anne house for his second wife, Hattie, whom he married in 1887. Unfortunately, Robinson died only six years after the house's completion. With gables galore, bold chimneys, a balcony above the sweeping front porch, a basket-handle arch framing a triple window dominating the northeast facade, an abundance of stained glass, and a vestibule paved with Minton tiles, this brick house with limestone trim is a glossary of Queen Anne details. Local carpenter A. G. Sturrock crafted the interior cherry, oak, and pine woodwork, including the three surviving fireplaces, which are faced with English Minton tiles.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Jesse Robinson House", [Wellsboro, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-TI7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 563-563.

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