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Charles Fletcher House

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1885. 1076 East Shore Rd.

The largest dwelling built in the development—too large to be truly cottagey—the Charles Fletcher House sits on an accumulation of plats overlooking the water. It was the summer retreat of a textile manufacturer who also commissioned one of Edmund Willson's more sumptuous houses on the East Side of Providence. It appears today as a somewhat plain version of a Queen Anne city house, but doubtless lost its original luxurious character of appearance in successive strip-downs through long subsequent use as a summer hotel (under two names). It was eventually enlarged for condominiums, then returned to a single-family residence. In its heyday, commentators heralded it as among the splendors of the island for its expansive veranda, lawn, carriage house, bathhouses, and dock. (The much altered carriage house is now a separate residence.)

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Charles Fletcher House", [Jamestown, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-JA5.6.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 588-588.

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