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John Nicholas Brown House (Harbour Court)

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Harbour Court
1904, Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson. 5 Halidon Ave.

Massive stuccoed walls and high hipped roofs loom on a rise set back from the street and overlooking Newport's inner harbor. The quoining, window treatments, columned loggia, and half-timbered service buildings show Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson creating a restrained but palatial-scaled, French-inspired manor house for this august client, one of the wealthiest men in America and the scion of one of Rhode Island's colonial families. The building now houses the New York Yacht Club's Newport facilities.

Near the entrance to the property is the small, board-and-batten building now known as Station No. 10, the first clubhouse, originally sited across from Manhattan in Hoboken, New Jersey. Probably designed by A. J. Davis in 1845 as a delightful seaside folly, it was moved several times before it was brought in 2000 to reside here, with its high, pitched roofline, flaring eaves, and ornamental tracery intact.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "John Nicholas Brown House (Harbour Court)", [Newport, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-NE184.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 580-580.

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