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Esmond Mill Housing

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320–338 Waterman Ave. (Farnum Pk.)

Esmond was also known at various times as Allenville and Enfield for a series of mill owners (the Allen being Philip, brother of Zachariah). Esmond, the final textile operator in this village, famous for blankets, pulled down the old mills and most of the old housing shortly after buying the village in 1905. So what exists is a sizable pier-and-spandrel plant in brick completed in 1907, standard for its period. It would nevertheless be impressive for its extended ranges of tall, spandrel-arched windows, except that the openings have been walled in. Workers' housing from the period is plentiful and generally well preserved. Along the west side of Waterman Avenue (or Farnum Pike) are duplexes designed in variations on Tudor themes lifted from the English model industrial towns of the first two decades of the twentieth century.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Esmond Mill Housing", [Smithfield, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-SM36.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 262-262.

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