You are here

Frank N. Bullock House

-A A +A
1928, John F. Staub. 311 Bay Ridge Rd.

For Houston businessman Frank N. Bullock and his family, Staub composed this shingle-surfaced, hipped-roof bay house to look smaller and more humble than it actually is. To insinuate the house into the Bay Ridge vernacular, Staub reproduced the narrow two-over-two-paned sash windows visible on older, carpenter-built houses, offsetting them with a stylish neo-Georgian entrance portal. As was typical in Bay Ridge, screened porches on the backside of the house look out across the downhill slope toward Galveston Bay and into the prevailing breeze coming off the water.

At 119 Bay Ridge Road is a well-preserved vernacular cottage of c. 1898. At numbers 203 and 403 are more commodious Craftsman-type cottages from the 1910s, while number 427 is a picturesque cottage, “Summer Home,” by Houston architects Rue and Dunbar from c. 1896. Next door, at number 431, is the Mediterranean-style W. H. Irvin House of 1928 by Joseph Finger. Many of these houses are obscured by foliage and not easily glimpsed from Bay Ridge Road. Most of the pre-1920s houses treated the bayside as the front face of the house and the street side as the rear.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "Frank N. Bullock House", [La Porte, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-AT25.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,