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South Upper Broadway

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1910–1928. 600 block of S. Upper Broadway

This block-long alignment of houses, sitting with landscaped lawns overlooking the bluff, collectively represents the last residential segment along Broadway. The Richard King House at number 611 (1928) by John M. Marriott was built for Captain King's banker grandson, who was active in bringing the port and naval air station to Corpus Christi. The two-story restrained Italian Renaissance house, sheathed in brick with cast-stone details, was rehabilitated as a law office in 1991. Next door at number 615, the Lichtenstein/Ward House (c. 1910) is a square-plan Queen Anne dwelling with Colonial Revival influences recalling the now-extinct wood-framed architecture along the bluff. At the corner at number 625, the Watson/Farenthold House (1920) is also Italian Renaissance and has an overscaled, rounded entrance porch and side wings.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
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Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "South Upper Broadway", [Corpus Christi, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-CC24.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 244-244.

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