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St. Mary's Church of the Assumption

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1895, O. Kramer. 821 FM 1295

St. Mary's is one of fifteen decorated churches in Texas listed in the National Register of Historic Places and among the oldest in the group. This rusticated-sandstone ashlar church was covered in stucco in 1930, leaving the sharply contrasting buttresses, hood moldings, and sills exposed. Interior painted decoration combines freehand work, stenciling, and infill work popular from the mid-to late nineteenth century. St. Mary's is associated with the Czech and German populations of early Texas and remains in active use, hosting festivals that gather the scattered generations of the original families. Gottfried Flurry, who immigrated to the United States in 1881 at the age of seventeen from Solothurn, Switzerland, was the artist for the ceiling decoration of religious images and vines. Before moving to San Antonio in 1891, he painted scenery in New York theaters.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
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Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "St. Mary's Church of the Assumption", [Flatonia, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-PF44.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 90-91.

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