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Fredericksburg Area Museum (City Hall and Market)

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City Hall and Market
1814–1816. 907 Princess Anne St. Open to the public
  • Fredericksburg Area Museum (City Hall and Market)

Examples of this building type, combining civic and town market functions, could be found along the East Coast in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Fredericksburg's is a rare survivor. Located on a high spot in the downtown, the structure replaced an earlier building near this site. The Princess Anne Street elevation is the formal town face: a fivebay central pavilion with two lower flanking wings, constructed in brick with Federal-era details. Originally the first floor of the center was rented to businesses, the municipality occupied the wings, and the upper floor was used for civic functions such as meetings and entertainments. Lafayette was feted here in 1824. The market side to the rear, or east, has been altered and the ground-level arcade enclosed, though meat hooks are still mounted on the stone piers. The yard, surfaced with Belgian paving block, was originally larger, and temporary wooden stalls were set up. The building is now restored and converted into a museum.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Fredericksburg Area Museum (City Hall and Market)", [Fredericksburg, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-FR1.

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