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Tuckahoe

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c. 1723 and later. River Rd. (VA 650) (.6 mile east of intersection of VA 650 and VA 647). Not visible from the road; open by appointment and during Garden Week
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Standing on a bluff above the James River, Tuckahoe is extremely complex. It is basically an H-shaped house covered in weatherboard, the north wing of which was begun by Thomas Randolph. The south wing, with its brick end, and the connecting salon were constructed by his son, William Randolph, after his marriage in 1734 to Judith Page, daughter of Mann Page I, of Rosewell. The north stair, presumably installed after this date, displays some of the finest carving of its period, a virtuoso display of rococo vines and leaves. On the northwest side of the house is a row of slave cabins for the house servants, a kitchen, and other outbuildings arranged in a formal pattern. East of the house is a schoolhouse (c. 1750), where Thomas Jefferson attended classes while his father, Peter Jefferson, lived at the plantation.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Tuckahoe", [, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-PI28.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 135-135.

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