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Virginia General Assembly Building (Life of Virginia Insurance Building)

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Life of Virginia Insurance Building
1906, Clinton and Russell. 1922, addition, Clinton and Russell. 1964, addition, Marcellus Wright and Associates. Colgate Darden Park (formerly Capitol St.) at 9th St. and Broad St. at 9th St.

The General Assembly Building reflects the long evolution of a private office complex recently adapted for government use. The original portion of the building facing Capitol Square is in scale with and provides a classical counterpoint to Old City Hall. With ornate layered Corinthian pilasters incorporating Pegasus figures and a large entablature and attic story, it is one of Richmond's most lavish classical buildings. Architects Clinton and Russell designed a number of commercial buildings in Richmond. The 1922 addition is more restrained and built to a larger scale that reflects the character of Broad Street. The 1964 Brutalist addition successfully maintains the rhythm of the earlier structures.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Virginia General Assembly Building (Life of Virginia Insurance Building)", [Richmond, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-RI7.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 180-180.

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