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Fairfield House

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c. 1770; later additions. Lord Fairfax Hwy. at Clifton Rd., 3.5 miles north of Berryville

Fairfield was once the center of the sixteen-hundred-acre plantation of Warner Washington, cousin of George Washington. The Georgian house resembles those of Washington's relatives in eastern Virginia except for its construction in limestone. The two-and-a-half-story hipped-roof house with interior chimneys now has a five-part composition, but the initial construction consisted only of the five-bay central block with its two side wings. The small pedimented front portico is a nineteenth-century addition, and the dormers on the central block, the one-story gable-end additions to the original wings, and the rear additions are twentieth century. By the mid-1780s, Washington possessed 135 slaves, making him the largest slaveholder in what was then Frederick County. His large, stately house was a clear manifestation of this wealth and status. Several other Washington family houses were built in the area, most of which are now located in neighboring Jefferson County, West Virginia.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Fairfield House", [Berryville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-CL9.

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