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Evans Building

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1888. 225–227 Main St.

Of the numerous compact, two-story brick commercial buildings on Main Street (many with intact upper stories and storefronts that have often been modernized), the oldest and least altered is this brick double structure linked by a central stairway bay serving both sides. It is distinguished by its original store-fronts on the first floor and three tall, arched Italianate windows with bold terra-cotta window caps on the second floor. The attic story is punctuated by three rows of bas-relief terra-cotta squares below a rosette-and-cable cornice. Because the left section of the building is less wide than the right side, the appearance of the whole is somewhat unsettling. It was built as a hardware store for E. L. Evans (see HX20), whose name, along with the date of construction, is centered in the building's entablature.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Evans Building", [South Boston, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-HX12.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 354-354.

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