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Christ Episcopal Church

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1875–1879, Emlyn Little; 1934 tower, Meade Bolton; 1942 parish hall, Carneal and Johnston; 1972, 1990 additions. 100 Church St. NE

This Gothic Revival stone church was the first in the county to abjure the nave plan with a front entrance and, instead, place the entrance on a side wall. The entrance was shifted to the front in 1934 when a large stone tower was added to a corner of the facade, which brought the church's appearance more in line with traditional Episcopal designs. Bolton designed the tower following suggestions from preeminent American Gothicist Ralph Adams Cram, whose firm was involved in campus planning at Virginia Tech. Buttresses line the side walls, two lancet windows fill the facade, a steep gable roof of slate covers the church, and the interior features exposed wood roof trusses. The parish hall wing is also Gothic Revival.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Christ Episcopal Church", [Blacksburg, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-MO14.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 432-432.

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