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Sharswood

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1848, Alexander Jackson Davis; later addition. 5685 Riceville Rd.

Built for Charles E. Miller, this fine house was designed by Davis of New York. Sharswood is almost a catalogue of Gothic Revival characteristics, from steep roof to clustered, polygonal chimney stacks, lacy bargeboards with finials here finished by fleur-de-lis crockets, a one-story porch with octagonal columns and tracery, diamond-paned windows, and hood molds over the windows (but no pointed-arch windows). Like most Gothic Revival houses in the area, it has a rectilinear form instead of picturesque massing. The whole is slightly marred by aluminum sheathing that covers the original siding.

Sharswood has retained a wide variety of outbuildings, including an office with sawn porch pillars, a brick smokehouse, a frame kitchen/quarters, and a cistern. On VA 640, just before the intersection with VA 40, is an almost abandoned mid-nineteenth-century, center-chimney workers' house that was probably associated with Sharswood.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Sharswood", [Gretna, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI22.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 365-365.

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