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Log Cabin Store and Edwards House

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1930–1933. 11365 Gretna Rd.

For the three years after his marriage in 1930, Tommy Edwards and two local builders constructed a house for his family with an adjacent grocery and filling station he called the Log Cabin Store. They created playfully rustic buildings with round logs and carefully chosen stones. Logs extend past the saddle-notched corners and their ends are painted like polka dots. Round cobblestones are vertically stacked and cemented to form exaggeratedly tapered columns for a drive-through porch on the three-bay one-story store and as facing for a chimney at the front of the cross-gable house. Small quartzite stones are used for more tapered columns and short bungalow-like piers on the one-story house. Other quartzite is used as chinking between the logs, outlined by raised mortar joints creating a woven pattern.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Log Cabin Store and Edwards House", [Gretna, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI24.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 365-366.

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