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Clement and Wheatley (Southern Amusement Company Building)

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Southern Amusement Company Building
1920–1922, Claude K. Howell; c. 1936 rear section, J. Bryant Heard. 549 Main St.

This fine Beaux-Arts Classical building, faced in glowing cream-colored terra-cotta, has Ionic pilasters on high pedestals separating the large-windowed facade into a central section flanked by two smaller sections. Exuberant cartouches with festoons decorate the spandrels, an elaborate carved band connects the lyre-decorated pilaster capitals, and a dentil cornice runs beneath the freestanding urn finials at the roofline. The building was designed as the facade for a theater that was never built and instead used as retail and office space. Calvert, Lewis and Associates restored the street-level exterior in 1987. To the right at 559–563 Main is Rippe's (1947), a women's clothing store, and Rippe's Shoes, a glossy mid-twentieth-century building with a curved entrance of glass blocks that Rippe's acquired in 1965.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Clement and Wheatley (Southern Amusement Company Building)", [Danville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI37.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 371-372.

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