You are here

Danville House (Hotel Danville)

-A A +A
Hotel Danville
1926–1928, H. A. Underwood and Company; 1983 renovated. 600 Main St.

Heralding the 1920s era of prosperity, major downtown hotels like this were stimulators and symbols of urban growth. They also changed the skylines of cities, and this one, at nine stories in height, looms large on Main Street. The steel and concrete structure is faced with red brick above a two-story false stone base that is colored to resemble granite. The roofline flaunts urns and a centered cartouche with scrolls above a balustraded parapet. Now renovated as residential apartments, the building once housed the hotel entered through the revolving door, a furniture showroom reached through the canted marquee entrance, and a theater inside the Main Street marquee entrance. An annex with a meat market is still marked by a terra-cotta bull's head over its entrance on Floyd Street.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Danville House (Hotel Danville)", [Danville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI39.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 372-372.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,