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Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History (Sutherlin House)

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Sutherlin House
1857–1858, Frank B. Clopton; c. 1935 and c. 1950 additions; 1981 restoration. 975 Main St.

Because Jefferson Davis spent his last week as president of the Confederacy in this spacious Italian Villa, the house is heralded as the last Capitol of the “Lost Cause.” Davis was the guest of Major William T. Sutherlin, prominent tobacconist, banker, businessman, and Confederate quartermaster of Danville, and his wife, Jane E. Patrick. His asymmetrical stuccoed house has a large, square belvedere with round-arched windows, and a low hipped roof with deeply projecting eaves supported on brackets. The northern rear addition dates to c. 1935 and the southern one to c. 1950 when the building served as a library. The house, now a museum and cultural center, was the center of an early-twenty-first-century storm over whether the Confederate flag should be flown here.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History (Sutherlin House)", [Danville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PI52.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 375-375.

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