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Jacks Creek Covered Bridge

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1914, Walter Weaver and Charlie Vaughn; 1974 restored, C. H. Coffman. VA 615 at Shady Ln., 2 miles south of Woolwine

Like its near neighbor the Bob White Covered Bridge (PT7), this bridge was designed by Weaver. It was built by Vaughn of Buffalo Ridge, and Peter C. Brammer and his son roofed the bridge because they were the only builders in the area with tools to crimp the tin sheathing. The bridge has an approximately forty-eight-foot span crossing Smith River. Its name apparently derived from Jacks Creek Primitive Baptist Church that it once served and not from Jacks Creek itself, which flows about one-half mile north of the bridge. The bridge's heavy oak framing has interior diagonal sheathing and exterior vertical sheathing of board-and-batten with a space below the eaves of the rafter roof left open for light and ventilation. The bridge was probably painted for the first time in 1969 when the Woolwine Ruritan Club raised money to color it reddish brown and to recover the roof. Unused since the 1960s when VA 615 was rerouted across a new bridge, Jacks Creek Covered Bridge was restored with funds from the National Park Service and the county.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Jacks Creek Covered Bridge", [Stuart, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PT6.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 238-238.

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