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Bob White Covered Bridge

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1920–1921, Walter Weaver. VA 618, just east of VA 708, 2.6 miles southeast of Woolwine

Spanning Smith River, this bridge has an approximately eighty-foot span and is built with heavy oak timbers. Weaver, a local carpenter, designed and constructed the bridge with the help of his family, using two forty-foot Burr trusses under a low-pitched roof sheathed with standing-seam metal. The Weavers covered the interior with diagonal sheathing and weatherproofed the exterior with vertical board-and-batten. At the entrances, the bridge has gable extensions that form a sheltering canopy. The Bob White is set on three concrete piers with a V-shaped, cut-water central pier facing upstream. The bridge was named for the former Bob White Post Office, which, in turn, was named for quail popularly called bobwhites for the sound of their mating call.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Bob White Covered Bridge", [Stuart, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-PT7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 238-239.

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