You are here

Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital

-A A +A
1956 East Pavilion, Eubank and Caldwell with Samuel Hannaford and Sons; 1971 West Pavilion, Eubank, Caldwell, Dobbins, Sherertz and Franklin. 1906 Belleview Ave.

Carilion is the region's major hospital complex and the city's largest employer. The huge Carilion complex began with the fourteen-story East Pavilion, a brick building pierced by narrow vertical bands of windows. This older section abuts the more recent West Pavilion with its green-glass walls. The two parts are tied together by a long canopied arrival area clad with sections of rough-faced and polished marble in front of a spacious skylit interior atrium. In the West Pavilion, many of the patients' rooms have fine views of the city, as do the offices in the building's rounded ends.

The Carilion complex has expanded across S. Jefferson Street SW with the construction of a large Cancer Center as well as a Medical Building and Clinic. A huge biomedical complex just across the Roanoke River from the hospital includes a clinic as well as the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (2010, HSMM AECOM) at Riverside Circle. Like the hospital, the school is also a brick structure with a curved section of green glass. Here, however, the ground floor is faced with Hokie stone, thereby making a nod to the traditional limestone building material of Virginia Tech (MO17), Carilion's partner in the medical school.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital", [Roanoke, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-RK46.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 421-421.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,