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Bush Mill

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1896. 1162 Bush Mill Rd.

Bush Mill suddenly appears around a bend as one heads west from Nickelsville. Situated on Amos Creek, the two-and-a-half-story weatherboarded frame mill set on a stone pier foundation is the region's only operational gristmill. Its large metal overshot wheel, a 1920s replacement of the wooden one, is attached to a shed-roofed extension of the mill's north gable end and part of the rebuilt millrace. On the opposite gable end is a shed-roofed porch sheltering a batten-door entrance. Constructed by Valentine Bush and his family, the mill still retains much of its original machinery. Local history sources indicate that the machinery for the mill was purchased from Tyler and Tate of Knoxville, Tennessee, shipped by rail to Gate City, and hauled by wagon to the mill site. Later known as Bond's Roller Mill for owners S. H. and W. W. Bond, the mill ceased most operations by the mid-twentieth century but has been restored for occasional use.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Bush Mill", [Nickelsville, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-SC4.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 498-498.

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