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Strasburg Museum (Strasburg Stone and Earthenware Manufacturing Company)

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Strasburg Stone and Earthenware Manufacturing Company
1891. 440 E. King St.

Although intending to continue the long tradition of pottery making in the region, the company nonetheless folded soon after it began to produce pottery on an industrial basis. It was unable to successfully compete with pottery from other regions. The large two-story, hipped-roof brick former factory is topped with a rectangular monitor roof. Because the building was located adjacent to the railroad tracks, in 1913 it was converted into a depot for the Southern Railway. The shed-roofed platforms along the front were added at that time. The building now serves as a museum of regional history. Nearby are several wooden warehouses that once served railroad transportation.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Strasburg Museum (Strasburg Stone and Earthenware Manufacturing Company)", [Strasburg, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-SH11.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 71-71.

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