You are here

Ted Wentz House

-A A +A
c. 1893. 19 W. 2nd St.

This imposing Queen Anne house, one of the largest and most prominent in Big Stone Gap, was built for Ted Wentz, who owned a controlling interest in the Virginia Coal and Iron Company. Standing among similar dwellings on 2nd Street, a fashionable turn-of-the-twentieth-century address for coal mining industrialists, the large wooden house has a cross-gabled roof, a conical-roofed corner tower nestled between the gables, and a wrap-around porch with turned posts and balusters. Single, paired, and tripled windows, some with arched heads, punctuate each elevation. Across the road at 18 W. 2nd is a handsome two-and-a-half-story brick house (c. 1895) with a hipped roof with flared eaves, dormers, and an exterior-end chimney with decorative brickwork. Tying the composition together is a wraparound porch and a projecting gabled entrance bay.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Ted Wentz House", [Big Stone Gap, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-WI22.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 511-511.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,