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Jonathan Willmarth House

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1851. VT 22A at Willmarth Rd.

Farmer and breeder Jonathan Willmarth constructed this early example of a Gothic Revival farm “cottage.” It is a good representative of the more than two dozen examples built in the mid-nineteenth century in western Addison County and one of the few that is largely unaltered. Essentially a Classic Cottage plan with an ell, it is distinguished by the twin, steeply pitched wall dormers, geometric foliate bargeboard trimming the gables, and a canted, corner-entrance front porch with the slatted and pierced porch supports characteristic of west-county Gothic Revival.

Grandson of an eighteenth-century settler, Willmarth established his place in a family neighborhood of five adjacent farms. The families prospered in the county's Merino sheep boom of 1824–1848, and Willmarth became a successful stock breeder. In 1876 he was a founding member of the Vermont Merino Sheep Breeders Association and was also known for breeding short-horned cattle and Yorkshire hogs. A bargeboard-trimmed shop and two barns behind the farmhouse are from this period, and an early-twentieth-century gambrel-roofed dairy barn now dominates the farmyard.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson
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Citation

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson, "Jonathan Willmarth House", [Addison, Vermont], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VT-01-AD3.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont, Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 108-108.

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