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Crowley House

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c. 1835. 4985 Main St., Newbury village

This impressive Greek Revival house was built as a new front for an earlier clapboarded wing, a practice that is not unusual in Vermont. By the 1830s, this type of broad gabled massing was popular for prominent commercial and residential buildings in Windsor and Orange counties. Here, it is treated in a specifically Greek fashion. The clapboarded gable has been pulled forward as a pediment set above a plain entablature carried on three bays of square paneled columns. The brick body has exchanged the arches of the Federal style for massive rectangular granite lintels, sills, and door surround. The door, which is broad with sidelights united by a single transom that has trellis-like muntins, is balanced in the pediment above with a triple window set beneath a semicircular fan louver. A basically Georgian-plan house has become an imposing temple.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson
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Citation

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson, "Crowley House", [Newbury, Vermont], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VT-01-OG14.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont, Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 334-334.

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