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Woods School (Bradford Academy)

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Bradford Academy
1894, George Guernsey; 1935 rear addition. 172 N. Main St., Bradford village

Bradford Academy was built with a bequest from John Lund Woods, a Corinth-born businessman based in Cleveland, Ohio, to replace a frame building the school had occupied since 1820. Guernsey of Montpelier designed the two-and-a-half-story building as a mirror image of his Royalton School (WS6) with a decked hipped roof, gable dormers, and a corner tower with an arcaded octagonal belfry and gableted polygonal cap. Here, however, he translated the Stick Style of Royalton into brick, handled with a characteristic penchant for vigorous contrasts in color and texture. Sills, lintels, and basement are of rusticated stone. The stone-framed semicircular windows that flank the horseshoe arch of the main entrance were Guernsey trademarks in the 1890s. Serving as Bradford's high school until 1971, the restored building now houses town offices, the historical society, and commercial tenants.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson
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Citation

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson, "Woods School (Bradford Academy)", [Bradford, Vermont], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VT-01-OG19.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont, Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 336-336.

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