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A. G. Tuttle House

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1869. East side of Elizabeth St., just north of 16th St.

This house once stood in a pastoral setting overlooking the Baraboo Bluffs and Baraboo Valley. Tuttle built his house in Gothic Revival, considered at the time an ideal style for rural estates, using characteristic board-and-batten walls. Small wooden finials and bargeboards pierced by diamonds, ovals, and stars accentuate the eaves of the steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof. Paired wooden columns and foliated wooden pendants embellish the full-width front porch. The building’s lines are emphatically angular, evident in such details too as the diamond-shaped louvered vents, triangular hoods above the second-story windows, and zigzag moldings underneath. A two-stall privy in the side yard mimics the design of the house. From 1860 until 1905, the Tuttle family operated the Baraboo Valley Nursery on the grounds of the estate.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Marsha Weisiger et al.
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Citation

Marsha Weisiger et al., "A. G. Tuttle House", [Baraboo, Wisconsin], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WI-01-SK17.

Print Source

Buildings of Wisconsin

Buildings of Wisconsin, Marsha Weisiger and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017, 491-492.

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