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Mukwonago Museum (Sewall Andrews House)

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1842. 103 Main St.

Sewall Andrews helped plat Mukwonago, Waukesha County’s first community, in 1836. He then established the village’s first store and in 1842 built what may have been the county’s first brick house at a crossroads in the town center. Andrews’s Greek Revival house with its pedimented gable, off-center entrance with sidelights and transom, and pronounced cornice and frieze was stylish amid the neighboring pioneer buildings. Unusual rope-twist moldings and rosettes trim the entrance. As a shopkeeper with suppliers in New York, Andrews had access to manufactured design elements such as these. The house’s core retains its original character, but slightly later the owners added the frame north wing, then the south wing, originally a woodshed and chicken house. In the 1920s, a rear porch and the three chimneys were also added.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Marsha Weisiger et al.
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Citation

Marsha Weisiger et al., "Mukwonago Museum (Sewall Andrews House)", [Mukwonago, Wisconsin], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WI-01-WK2.

Print Source

Buildings of Wisconsin

Buildings of Wisconsin, Marsha Weisiger and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017, 194-194.

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