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Big Four Building

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1907, J. B. Stewart. Southeast corner of Temple St. and 3rd Ave.

This four-story, yellow brick building, designed by a Huntington architect, was a joint commercial-fraternal enterprise, with stores on the first floor and apartments and lodge rooms above. As is true of its exact contemporary, the Hotel McCreery, walls are capped with a metal cornice and short parapet. The building accommodates its corner location with an angled bay, while the 3rd Avenue entrance to the upper stories is framed with limestone Corinthian columns, above which a panel carries the legend 19 Brotherhood 07. The four railroad brotherhoods—the Order of Railway Conductors, the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Locomotive Engineers, and Locomotive Firemen—sponsored the building. In a newspaper article touting the city's progress, Hinton's mayor proudly noted that “one of our $75,000 buildings is being built by 300 Brotherhood railroad men by subscribing to the stock in amounts ranging from $100 to $500.” First-floor storefronts have been altered, but the upper stories are unchanged.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
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Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "Big Four Building", [Hinton, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-SU4.

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