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St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church

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1898–1899, John W. Werninger. 1974. Southeast corner of Temple St. and 2nd Ave.

This building of hard-pressed red brick replaced an 1878 frame church on the site. Gothic Revival elements and proportions are more earnest than academic, and one could wish for another stage to the projecting front tower, which barely rises above the ridge of the roof before turning into a spire. The sanctuary, raised on a high basement, is entered from a porch contained within the tower. Except for the new steps and basement entrance, the exterior is virtually unchanged from when the church was dedicated in 1889. In 1974, on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the parish, the interior was rearranged and redecorated to accord with the liturgical provisions of Vatican II.

Rev. Werninger, on leave from his Huntington post to oversee construction of the church, is credited locally as its architect and builder. St. Patrick's stands as evidence of the faith of the Irish, Italian, and eastern Europeans who came to work on the C&O Railway and in the nearby coal mines.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
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Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church", [Hinton, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-SU3.

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