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Stone Shop

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1919–1935. Main St.

The stone shop is an amalgam of three buildings. The east wing, built of poured concrete and erected in 1919, was originally used as a blacksmith shop and later converted into a Chevrolet garage. In 1935, Lloyd Damrow and Oscar Bradbury built the center portion with the one-and-a-half-story front gable, opening a business called the Jay Em Onyx and Gem Company, which made headstones, fireplace mantels, paper weights, and jewelry. The wood-framed west wing was constructed soon after, mirroring the shape of the east wing, resulting in a nearly symmetrical front facade. The interior of this building still contains the overhead equipment and saws required to cut large pieces of stone.

References

Gorman, Michael, and WRC Staff, “Jay Em Historic District,” Goshen County, Wyoming. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1984. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C.

CTA Architects Engineers. Architectural & Structural Assessment of the Town of Jay Em, November 10, 2010.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lesley M. Gilmore
Coordinator: 
Mary M. Humstone
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Data

Timeline

  • 1919

    Stone shop built

What's Nearby

Citation

Lesley M. Gilmore, "Stone Shop", [Jay Em, Wyoming], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WY-01-015-0018-02.

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