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Teeland's

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1905

Orville George Herning first opened the country store now known as Teeland's as a general supply store in Knik in 1905. When Knik was bypassed by the Alaska Railroad, Herning moved his small log store (no longer extant) to the townsite of Wasilla, adding a large wood-framed store building. The 23-foot-by-75-foot wood-framed building was covered with corrugated metal. Entrance was through a center door, between large windows. The second floor of the one-and-a-half-story structure was used for storage.

Walter Teeland bought the store in 1947 and operated it until 1972. Teeland changed the entrance from the front to an entryway on the side. The next owner, Julian Mead, added a liquor business in an attached shed. He donated the building to the Wasilla-Knik-Willow Creek Historical Society in 1987. When it was moved from its former site on the Parks Highway, about a block away, a new lower level was built, creating a basement story in the rear.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Alison K. Hoagland
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Data

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Citation

Alison K. Hoagland, "Teeland's", [Wasilla, Alaska], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AK-01-SC083.2.

Print Source

Buildings of Alaska, Alison K. Hoagland. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 129-129.

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