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Birchwood Station

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1916. Mile 50 Parks Hwy.

Now on its fourth site, the Birchwood Station has been removed from the railroad it used to serve. Built as the railroad station in Birchwood, near Anchorage, this building was moved to Willow in 1931 to serve as the station there. In the 1960s it was acquired by the State Highway Commission, which moved it about a mile to serve as a maintenance facility. In 1963, it was moved to its present site where it now houses a craft shop.

The hip-roofed building has an unusual second-story dormer, repeating the form of the bay window above which it sits. The hip roof has exposed rafter ends and brackets at its broad eaves. The wood-framed building is covered with novelty siding, placed vertically up to window-sill level, and horizontally above. The building has been doubled in size by an addition to the rear, and the porch across half of the front is not original, but the station retains its railroad-building appearance.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Alison K. Hoagland
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Citation

Alison K. Hoagland, "Birchwood Station", [Wasilla, Alaska], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AK-01-SC084.

Print Source

Buildings of Alaska, Alison K. Hoagland. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 129-130.

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