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Genesee Mountain Park, Subdivision, and Office Park

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Exit 252 off I-70

The park is approached from I-70 via Genesee Overpass (1970, Frank Lunberg). The Colorado Department of Transportation engineer made this simple pillarless concrete bridge into a frame for a spectacular view of the snowcapped Continental Divide. Genesee Mountain Park (1914, Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., and others) was the first of some forty-five Denver Mountain Parks covering about 15,000 acres in Jefferson, Clear Creek, and Douglas counties. Best known as the home of Denver's municipal buffalo herd, Genesee Park is a ponderosa-clad landscape centered on Mt. Genesee. The park is now surrounded by a well-planned residential community and a small office park and shopping center. The one-story frame Oxley Homestead House (c. 1922), at Currant Drive and Genesee Vista Road, one-time center for a turkey farm, has became the community center for one of the first and best-known master-planned mountain subdivisions. Tight covenants outlaw groomed grass, fences, and individual mailboxes, while protecting native animals and plants.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Genesee Mountain Park, Subdivision, and Office Park", [Golden, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-JF44.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 163-163.

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